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Civil War

Civil War

150,000+ Sign French Letter Warning Of Civil War, Demanding Major Anti-Islamist Changes To Society

150,000+ Sign French Letter Warning Of Civil War, Demanding Major Anti-Islamist Changes To Society

On April 21, thousands of French servicemen and women, including some 20 retired generals signed a letter warning political leaders that the country was heading for civil war as a result of the increasing threat of radical Islam. Now, after condemnations from France’s political establishment, thousands more have signed a new document doubling-down. Government ministers condemned the original message, some likening it to a military putsch. Marine Le Pen – French President Emmanuel Macron’s likely opponent in the 2022 French Presidential election – welcomed the letter and called on the generals to join her for a political solution to ...
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72 Republicans Vote with Democrats to Remove Civil War-Era Memorabilia from U.S. Capitol

72 Republicans Vote with Democrats to Remove Civil War-Era Memorabilia from U.S. Capitol

A total of 72 House Republicans voted with Democrats to remove certain Civil War-era memorabilia from public view in the United States Capitol. The legislation, sponsored by Rep. Steny Hoyer (D-MD), mandates that a bust of former Supreme Court Justice Roger Brooke Taney sitting in the U.S. Capitol be replaced with a bust of former Supreme Court Justice Thurgood Marshall. Additionally, the Democrat plan mandates the removal from public view of U.S. Capitol statues depicting Charles Brantley Aycock, John Caldwell Calhoun, and James Paul Clarke. Each of the statues would eventually be returned to their respective states. Likewise, any memorabilia depicting members ...
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Juneteenth: America's 2nd Independence Day as Slaves are Freed in TX after Major General Granger Enforces Emancipation Proclamation Order

Juneteenth: America’s 2nd Independence Day as Slaves are Freed in TX after Major General Granger Enforces Emancipation Proclamation Order

Juneteenth is the oldest nationally celebrated commemoration of the ending of slavery in the United States.  Dating back to 1865, it was on June 19th that the Union soldiers, led by Major General Gordon Granger, landed at Galveston, Texas with news that the war had ended and that the enslaved were now free. Note that this was two and a half years after President Lincoln’s Emancipation Proclamation - which had become official January 1, 1863. The Emancipation Proclamation had little impact on the Texans due to the minimal number of Union troops to enforce the new Executive Order. However, with the surrender of General Lee in April of 1865, and the arrival of General ...
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Lincoln's Elkins Letter: "corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow"

Lincoln’s Elkins Letter: “corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow”

Archer G. Shaw, ed, Library of Congress, intro. (1950). William F. Elkins Ltr. (Nov. 21, 1864), VERIFIED, The Lincoln Encyclopedia; the spoken and written words of A. Lincoln, 416 pgs., pp. , , . Macmillan Company. “As a result of the war, corporations have been enthroned and an era of corruption in high places will follow, and the money power of the country will endeavor to prolong its reign by working upon the prejudices of the people until all wealth is aggregated in a few hands and the Republic is destroyed. I feel at this moment more anxiety for the safety of my ...
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Susan B. Anthony Delivers 100,000+ Signatures to U.S. Senate to Ban Slavery

Susan B. Anthony Delivers 100,000+ Signatures to U.S. Senate to Ban Slavery

Feminists and suffragists had agreed to suspend the women’s rights conventions until after the Civil War, but many of those same women continued the fight to abolish slavery. In 1863 two leading feminist reformers, Susan B. Anthony and Elizabeth Cady Stanton organized the Woman’s National Loyal League, the first national women’s political organization in the United States, to organize support for an amendment to the U.S. Constitution that would end slavery forever. At the May 1863 meeting of the newly formed Woman’s National Loyal League, Lucy Stone reminded the members that while women did not yet have the vote, they had what the U.S. Constitution ...
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The Reconstruction Era Begins (December 8, 1863 – March 31, 1877)

The Reconstruction Era Begins (December 8, 1863 – March 31, 1877)

The Reconstruction era was the period in American history which lasted from 1863 to 1877. It was a significant chapter in the history of American civil rights. The term has two applications: the first applies to the complete history of the entire country from 1865 to 1877 following the American Civil War; the second, to the attempted transformation of the 11 former Confederate states from 1863 to 1877, as directed by Congress, and the role of the Union states in that transformation. Reconstruction ended the remnants of Confederate secession and abolished slavery, making the newly freed slaves citizens with civil rights ostensibly guaranteed by three new constitutional amendments.1 Its ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Delivers his Gettysburg Address

Abraham Lincoln’s Delivers his Gettysburg Address

On June 1, 1865, Senator Charles Sumner referred to the most famous speech ever given by President Abraham Lincoln. In his eulogy on the slain president, he called the Gettysburg Address a "monumental act." He said Lincoln was mistaken that "the world will little note, nor long remember what we say here." Rather, the Bostonian remarked, "The world noted at once what he said, and will never cease to remember it. The battle itself was less important than the speech." There are five known copies of the speech in Lincoln's handwriting, each with a slightly different text, and named ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Thanksgiving Proclamation which Set the Precedent for America's National Day of Thanksgiving ...and the Woman Behind It

Abraham Lincoln’s Thanksgiving Proclamation which Set the Precedent for America’s National Day of Thanksgiving …and the Woman Behind It

Secretary of State William Seward wrote it and Abraham Lincoln issued it, but much of the credit for the proclamation should probably go to a woman named Sarah Josepha Hale. A prominent writer and editor, Hale had written the children’s poem “Mary Had a Little Lamb,” originally known as “Mary’s Lamb,” in 1830 and helped found the American Ladies Magazine, which she used a platform to promote women’s issues. In 1837, she was offered the editorship of “Godey’s Lady Book,” where she would remain for more than 40 years, shepherding the magazine to a circulation of more than 150,000 ...
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The Battle of Gettysburg Begins

The Battle of Gettysburg Begins

The Battle of Gettysburg was fought July 1–3, 1863, in and around the town of Gettysburg, Pennsylvania, by Union and Confederate forces during the American Civil War. The battle involved the largest number of casualties of the entire war and is often described as the war's turning point. Union Maj. Gen. George Meade's Army of the Potomac defeated attacks by Confederate Gen. Robert E. Lee's Army of Northern Virginia, ending Lee's attempt to invade the North. The two armies suffered between 46,000 and 51,000 casualties. Union casualties were 23,055 (3,155 killed, 14,531 wounded, 5,369 captured or missing), while Confederate casualties ...
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Abraham Lincoln's Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day

Abraham Lincoln’s Proclamation Appointing a National Fast Day

Sarah J. Hale, a writer and the editor of a popular women’s magazine, Godey’s Ladies Journal, was born on October 24th, 1788 in Newport, New Hampshire. Her parents Gordon Buell and Martha Whittlesay Buell believed in equal education for both genders, so Sarah was home-schooled by her mother. Later, Sarah became a local schoolteacher and in 1813 she married a lawyer, David Hale. Together, Sarah and her husband formed a small literary club and soon she began writing. After the death of her husband in 1822, Sarah turned to writing to support herself and her five children. Hale authored many books and hundreds of poems, including ...
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The Emancipation Proclamation Goes into Effect

The Emancipation Proclamation Goes into Effect

In the 1857 Dred Scott decision, the U. S. Supreme Court – disregarding the constitutionally-authorized ban – declared that Congress could not interfere with slavery or prohibit it in any territory, thereby “reopening the African slave trade [through] perversions of judicial power.” Republicans won the election of 1860 and, in accordance with this plank in their platform, they begin to take action to end slavery. For example, in  1862, they passed a federal law prohibiting slavery in the federal territories – a direct affront to the 1857 Dred Scott decision in which the U. S. Supreme Court had forbidden ...
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Following the Battle of Antietam, President Lincoln Decides: "“The time for the annunciation of the emancipation policy can no longer be delayed."

Following the Battle of Antietam, President Lincoln Decides: ““The time for the annunciation of the emancipation policy can no longer be delayed.”

The Confederate Army was unstoppable – within weeks of winning the Civil War. General Robert E. Lee had won the Second Battle of Bull Run and was marching 55,000 Confederate troops into Maryland on Sept. 3, 1862. The Confederate Army was welcomed into Maryland as anti-Union protests had been filling Baltimore’s streets. On Sept. 13, 1862, President Lincoln met with Rev. William Patterson, Rev. John Dempster and other Methodist, Baptist and Congregational leaders. The ministers presented Lincoln with a petition urging him to emancipate the slaves. Lincoln told them: “I am approached with the most opposite opinions and advice ...
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President Lincoln received the first Telegram from a Balloon

President Lincoln received the first Telegram from a Balloon

June 18th 1861, Thaddeus Lowe ascended with a tethered balloon five hundred feet above the National Mall. He intended to demonstrate, amid the Civil War, practicality of observing enemy troop movements from the air. His audience was the Commander-in-Chief. A telegraph wire connected the basket with the White House. The scientist sent a message to the President Lincoln: This point of observation commands an area nearly fifty miles in diameter. The city, with its girdle of encampments, presents a superb scene. I take great pleasure in sending you this first dispatch ever telegraphed from an aerial station, and in ...
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The American Civil War Begins and Lasts Over 4 Years. Why Did the South Really go to War?

The American Civil War Begins and Lasts Over 4 Years. Why Did the South Really go to War?

On April 12, 1861, the war began when Brig. Gen. P.G.T. Beauregard opened fire on Fort Sumter in Charleston harbor forcing its surrender. In response to the attack, President Lincoln called for 75,000 volunteers to suppress the rebellion. While Northern states responded quickly, Virginia, North Carolina, Tennessee, and Arkansas refused, opting to join the Confederacy instead. In July, Union forces commanded by Brig. Gen. Irvin McDowell began marching south to take the rebel capital of Richmond. On the 21st, they met a Confederate army near Manassas and were defeated.  (Source) What was the Real Cause of the American Civil ...
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The 13th Amendment that Never Was! President Lincoln Sends a Form Letter to All State Governors to Amend the Constitution Guaranteeing States the Right to Own Slaves

The 13th Amendment that Never Was! President Lincoln Sends a Form Letter to All State Governors to Amend the Constitution Guaranteeing States the Right to Own Slaves

The discovery of a letter from newly inaugurated President Abraham Lincoln to the governor of Florida has generated renewed interest in Lincoln's views toward slavery. The letter, found at the Lehigh County Historical Society in Allentown, Pennsylvania, is a form letter from Lincoln to Governor Madison S. Perry transmitting "an authenticated copy of a Joint Resolution to amend the Constitution of the United States." On March 16, 1861, Lincoln sent the same letter to all of the governors of the states, including states that had already seceded from the Union and formed their own confederate government. What was this ...
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President Franklin Pierce signed the divisive Kansas-Nebraska Act into Law

President Franklin Pierce signed the divisive Kansas-Nebraska Act into Law

In 1854, Senator Stephen Douglas of Illinois proposed a bill to organize the Territory of Nebraska, a vast area of land that would become Kansas, Nebraska, Montana and the Dakotas. Known as the Kansas-Nebraska Act, the controversial bill raised the possibility that slavery could be extended into territories where it had once been banned. Its passage intensified the bitter debate over slavery in the United States, which would later explode into the Civil War. The discovery of gold in California in 1849, and California’s subsequent request to become a state, sparked a fierce battle in Congress. As California had banned slavery, its admission to the Union ...
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