Taking Back Our Stolen History
HISTORY HEIST
Inspired Leaders

Inspired Leaders

Martin Luther King Delivers His Iconic "I Have a Dream" Speech on the Steps at Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC

Martin Luther King Delivers His Iconic “I Have a Dream” Speech on the Steps at Lincoln Memorial in Washington DC

Dr. Martin Luther King Jr. delivered his iconic "I Have a Dream" speech on the steps of the Lincoln Memorial, and it has since become one of the most famous orations in history. You’ve seen the clips and heard its most famous lines on countless occasions, but here are some of the things you probably didn’t know about how the speech was written, how it was delivered, and how it was received. 1. King had previously used his “dream” rhetoric before — “many times before,” as he acknowledged — in lesser-known speeches. 2. King may have taken the "dream" language from then-22-year-old ...
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Inauguration of President Washington: He Gives a Religious Address and Places Hand on Bible Verse Prophesying America as a Covenant Nation?

Inauguration of President Washington: He Gives a Religious Address and Places Hand on Bible Verse Prophesying America as a Covenant Nation?

David Barton of Wallbuilders gives some details of the inauguration of the first President of the U.S.: Constitutional experts abounded in 1789 at America’s first presidential inauguration. Not only was the inauguree a signer of the Constitution but one fourth of the members of the Congress that organized and directed his inauguration had been delegates with him to the Constitutional Convention that produced the Constitution. Furthermore, this very same Congress also penned the First Amendment and its religious clauses. Because Congress, perhaps more than any other, certainly knew what was constitutional, the religious activities that were part of the ...
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George Washington’s Crossing of the Delaware River in the Dead of the Night on Christmas

George Washington’s Crossing of the Delaware River in the Dead of the Night on Christmas

So why were Washington and his bedraggled Continental Army trying to cross an ice-choked Delaware River on a cold winter’s night? It wasn’t just to get to the other side. Washington’s aim was to conduct a surprise attack upon a Hessian garrison of roughly 1,400 soldiers located in and around Trenton, New Jersey. Washington hoped that a quick victory at Trenton would bolster sagging morale in his army and encourage more men to join the ranks of the Continentals come the new year. Washington also understood that the element of surprise was the only way that he and his ...
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General Washington to his Army: "Let us rely upon the goodness of the cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being in whose hands victory is..."

General Washington to his Army: “Let us rely upon the goodness of the cause, and the aid of the Supreme Being in whose hands victory is…”

On July 2, 1776, from his headquarters in New York, General Washington issued his general orders: “The time is now near at hand which must probably determine whether Americans are to be freemen or slaves; whether they are to have any property they can call their own; whether their houses and farms are to be pillaged and destroyed, and themselves consigned to a state of wretchedness from which no human efforts will deliver them. The fate of unborn millions will now depend, under God, on the courage and conduct of this army. Our cruel and unrelenting enemy leaves us ...
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George Washington Writes in a Letter to his Brother, "Providence Which Has in Many Instances Appear’d for Us, Will Still Go On to Afford Its Aid"

George Washington Writes in a Letter to his Brother, “Providence Which Has in Many Instances Appear’d for Us, Will Still Go On to Afford Its Aid”

On May 31, 1776, George Washington wrote to his younger brother John Augustine Washington, We expect a very bloody Summer of it at New York. … We are not either in Men, or Arms, prepared for it. … If our cause is just, as I do most religiously believe it to be, the same Providence which has in many instances appear’d for us, will still go on to afford its aid. Recommended Book: What sets "George Washington's Sacred Fire" apart from all previous works on this man for the ages, is the exhaustive fifteen years of Dr. Peter Lillback's ...
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George Washington Orders his Troops to Observe the Day of Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer for the 'Giver of Victory to Prosper Our Arms'

George Washington Orders his Troops to Observe the Day of Fasting, Humiliation, and Prayer for the ‘Giver of Victory to Prosper Our Arms’

The rag-tag and green Continental Army would need heaven’s help. In April 1776, they arrived in New York, a city with a large population of Loyalists and surrounded by water that was conducive to a British naval attack. By June the British fleet arrived in the harbor with some four hundred ships. It was at this time, the largest force ever sent forth by one nation to another. One of Washington’s men wrote, “I declare that I thought all London was afloat.” The Americans numbered well under half of the British troops, but they did have a promise of ...
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Reverend John Peter Gabriel Muhlenburg Removes His Robe to Reveal his Colonel Uniform, Recruiting 300 Patriots to Enlist & Defend Liberty

Reverend John Peter Gabriel Muhlenburg Removes His Robe to Reveal his Colonel Uniform, Recruiting 300 Patriots to Enlist & Defend Liberty

Toward the end of 1775, Muhlenberg was authorized to raise and command as its colonel the 8th Virginia Regiment of the Continental Army. After George Washington personally asked him to accept this task, he agreed. However, his brother Fredrick Augustus Muhlenberg, who was also a minister, did not approve of him going into the army until the British burned down his own church in front of him. Then he joined the military himself. According to a biography written by his great nephew in the mid-19th century, on January 21, 1776 in the Lutheran church in Woodstock, Virginia, Reverend Muhlenberg ...
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The First Prayer of Congress on September 7, 1774

The First Prayer of Congress on September 7, 1774

The first session of the Continental Congress opened the beginning of September in the year 1774 with prayer in Carpenter’s Hall, Philadelphia. Threatened by the most powerful monarch in the world, Britain’s King George III, America’s founding fathers heard Rev. Jacob Duché begin by reading Psalm 35, the Anglican Book of Common Prayer’s “Psalter” for that day Sept. 7, 1774: “Plead my cause, Oh, Lord, with them that strive with me, fight against them that fight against me. Take hold of buckler and shield, and rise up for my help. Draw also the spear and the battle-axe to meet ...
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The First Official Act of Congress: A Call to Prayer!

The First Official Act of Congress: A Call to Prayer!

The first official act of Congress was a call to prayer that the Rev. Mr. Duché be desired to open the Congress tomorrow morning with prayers, at the Carpenter's Hall, at 9 o'clock." When the Congress met, Mr. Cushing made a motion that it should be opened with Prayer. It was opposed by Mr. Jay of New York and Mr. Rutledge of South Carolina because we were so divided in religious sentiments, some Episcopalians, some Quakers, some Anabaptists, some Presbyterians and some Congregationalists, that we could not join in the same act of worship. Mr. Samuel Adams arose and said, "that ...
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“Speech to the Troops at Tilbury” by Queen Elizabeth I of England

“Speech to the Troops at Tilbury” by Queen Elizabeth I of England

The Speech to the Troops at Tilbury was delivered on 9 August Old Style, 19 August New Style 1588 by Queen Elizabeth I of England to the land forces earlier assembled at Tilbury in Essex in preparation for repelling the expected invasion by the Spanish Armada. Prior to the speech the Armada had been driven from the Strait of Dover in the Battle of Gravelines eleven days earlier, and had by then rounded Scotland on its way home, but troops were still held at ready in case the Spanish army of Alexander Farnese, the Duke of Parma, might yet ...
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Joan of Arc Burnt at the Stake in Rouen's Market Square in France

Joan of Arc Burnt at the Stake in Rouen’s Market Square in France

A young peasant girl who could neither read nor write, she followed the voices and visions from God and completely reversed the course of the 100 Year War (with England occupying most cities) and kept France from becoming a colony of England. Greatly celebrated by her own people she was hated by the English who ultimately captured her and rigged a trial under the auspices of the Church to justify burning her at the stake. She fought for freedom for her people, but would not deny her religious convictions in order to obtain her own freedom. Twenty-five years later ...
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